Being safe in India

Being Safe in India

It is well-known that India is a land of great diversity. So, of course, it also applies to the safety of dancers. Sometimes the security at work is organised to the level of being almost funny, but every now and then going out on stage can be downright dangerous.

In the Indian context I am a relatively tall person. However, there are people taller than me, and it seems that most of them are employed as bouncers at clubs and restaurants. 🙂 Usually they are doing a very good job making the dancer feel safe – when I spent two weeks dancing at a restaurant in Punjab, there was always a bouncer (or two on busier nights) following me during my show. It felt a bit like a game, really… I was just dancing away, and the guy was doing his best keeping up with me between the tables.

Sometimes the security is so tight that the dancer literally dances in a circle of bouncers. It feels very exclusive, but remeber, these guys are tall… so I am not sure how much dancing the audience actually sees. Sometimes there is a photographer inside the circle with me, so I guess they can just check the photos on Facebook later 😉

Safran and security team

With my security team in Ludhiana, Punjab

But things are not always so well organised. I’ve danced at shows, some of them even in five-star hotels, where no security whatsoever is present. When one drunk guy climbs on stage, an experienced dancer can handle it (especially it happens during a saidi ;). But sometimes it is a mass of drunken men, and then it gets scary.

Random guys veering into backstage, and popping into changing rooms is unfortunately a common thing here. Sometimes they are just harmless creeps, but sometimes they are drunk and feel they have all the rights in the world. Once, the party organisers had to build a barrier out of crates of stage equipment just to keep the drunk guests out of backstage. And, of course there were guys trying to dismantle it!

Another thing, which I fortunately haven’t experienced so far, is people throwing things at the dancer. And I am not talking about children tossing rose petals (this has happened to me 🙂 ). But my colleagues have been showered with water or alcohol while they are dancing. Sometimes glasses have been broken at their feet, or just hurled at their general direction.

How such incidents are handled, also varies. Sometimes the client or manager offers a half-hearted apology and insists on continuing with performances.  Sometimes security measurers are improvised – like creating a human wall of stage workers. And sometimes we just pack up and leave as quickly as possible.

And this whole thing only concerned the on-site aspect of dancers’s security. I hope to write more about general safety issues soon.

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